Here we go, the production nominations for the 1st Ever Annual Movie Dude Awards! I’ve got nothing else to say so let’s get straight into it!

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Art direction is the world in which a film exists brought to life. It’s the window through which we view this world, but while our range can vary there are no boundaries. Through art direction we can see an entire world from atop the lonely mountain, inside the walls of a hotel in the Republic of Zubrowka, perhaps among the trees of a fairy tale forest, within a perpetually moving train through a winter apocalypse or maybe a glimpse into yesteryear, like Los Angeles in 1970.

Where we are, what time in history or how large the scope – none of that matters. What counts comes down to the minutest of detail, from graphics to colour to craft and design. Through this worlds can be brought to life, no matter where and when, and last year these five films did it better than all.

Best Ever Art Direction

The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Hobbit

Inherent Vice

 Into The WoodsSnowpiercer

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A single tracking shot throughout an entire film, some amazingly inventive camera work, great profile shots and the landscape of space. Until the camera is rolling it’s all just visions in someone’s head, but at some point in time they were drawn up and shot from different angles until at last that perfect perspective was found. The foresight needed to do this is amazing, anyone can just start rolling and capture a scene but to capture these scenes so perfectly is what helps take these films to a whole new level.

Best Ever Cinematography & Editing

Birdman

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Ida

Interstellar

Leviathan

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Many things go into the creation of a character in cinema. What is their name and how old are they? Where do they live and under what circumstances? What is their motivation? Those are the standards when you’re inventing a life, but here’s a tough one that’s often forgotten; what does your character look like and what do they wear?

Costume and make-up are personality and circumstance on display for all to see; the perfect look at the inner workings of a character. The cast in each of the five nominated films have all got their own costumes and make-up that help mould them into the people we see on-screen. To put this work into perspective; every single one of them must be dressed and made up, right down to the smallest button and shoelace, and those who work in these two departments really came to the fore in these films.

Best Ever Costume Design & Make-Up

Get On Up

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Inherent Vice

Mr. Turner

Yves Saint Laurent

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Writing is one of those talents that you either have or you don’t. You can practice for as long as you like but there’s a certain magic to creating the perfect screenplay that cannot be taught. Each of the nominated screenplays had the task of representing a certain period in time, from the Republic of Zubrowka in 1932 to WWII-era London to the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement to L.A in 1970 to the modern day. These five writers (Paul Thomas Anderson, Wes Anderson, Dan Gilroy, Graham Moore and Ava DuVernay) did it superbly, every single one, and for two hours we travelled to a time when many of us may not have been alive, and we saw life in those times as if we lived them ourselves.

Best Ever Screenplay

Inherent Vice

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Nightcrawler

The Imitation Game

Selma

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Music is one of the greatest aspects of film. It sets tone and brings emotion to any scene, making a film multidimensional. The beauty of music is it can be adapted for any or all circumstances depicted on-screen but it’s the approach of the composer that makes it unique.

Two films nominated are set during World War II, their scores are orchestral and yet because of their composition they create emotion in different ways. The others are more inventive in their approach as one is big band jazz, another is a twist on the standard orchestra approach and the final is so laden with synthesiser it sounds like it came from outer space.

The notes used don’t matter, how they’re executed does and these five scores were instrumental in making their films multidimensional.

Best Ever Score

Alexandre Desplat for “Daylight Express To Lutz” in The Grand Budapest Hotel

Alexandre Desplat for “The Imitation Game” in The Imitation Game

Justin Hurwitz for “Overture” in Whiplash

Steven Price for “Norman” in Fury

Hans Zimmer for “No Time For Caution” in Interstellar

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If a score is used to set tone and create emotion then a song is to convey that tone and emotion. It can be a fond farewell, a sweetly-sung call to arms or an emotional act of defiance, they all carry conveyance and deliver on emotion. Unfortunately a short paragraph can’t convey that emotion so listen for yourself. And yes, there are six nominations because I just couldn’t split them.

Best Ever Song

Gregg Alexander, Danielle Brisebois, Keira Knightley & Nick Southwood for “Lost Stars” in Begin Again

Billy Boyd for “The Last Goodbye” in The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies

James Newton Howard & Jennifer Lawrence for “The Hanging Tree” in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

Lenny Kaye & Patti Smith for “Mercy Is” in Noah

Salif Keita, Fally Ipupa, Youssou Ndour & J. Ralph for “We Will Not Go” in Virunga

Jesse Eisenberg, Anne Hathaway & Janelle Monae for “What Is Love” in Rio 2

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The epitome of technological advancement in cinema is the use of CGI. Once upon a time it was a specialty but now it’s standard and can be used to either transport audiences around the world and across the galaxy or it can be used to create life in robots and tame apes. But don’t take my word for it, watch these five behind-the-scenes features and see this creation in action.

Best Ever Visual Effects

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We are getting close! I’ve decided to go all-in on this so my next posts will be the acting nominations followed by the nominations for best director and best picture. After that I will name a date (and if all goes according to plan it’s a lot closer than you think).

After that’s all said and done I’ll be doing my trailer reviews (revamped!) before I give you my highly-anticipated review of the long-awaited Avengers: Age Of Ultron. Good times ahead for all of us, so stay tuned and enjoy!

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